As an author and certified school librarian, I love working with kids and teens. I am available  for presentations, writing workshops, and book groups at schools, libraries, and homeschool groups. If you are interested, please contact me directly: megan @ meganfrazer.com.

Megan Presenting
Photo courtesy of Stacey Rattner, Castleton Middle School (NY)

What’s a visit like?

Check out this story from Island Readers & Writers about my visits to small communities in Maine.

Want a sneak peek at what I will talk about? Watch this video created by Locomotion Multimedia:

What If created by Sharyn Alice Murray on Vimeo.

 

What Kids Say:

“I never liked writing, but you make it sound like fun. I’m going to try again.” – 5th grader in Vermont

“For some reason, I want to go home and write a book today.” – 5th grader in New York

Writing Workshops & Presentations:

What do Writers Do: The Power of What If?

Grades K-8, 45 minutes plus time for questions.

What do writers do? Writers ask, “What if?” Using examples from her own work, as well as other novels, she explains how asking “What if?” questions opens up the world of the story. Students are invited to respond to prompts with their own “What if?” ideas.

Common Core Connections:

  • Text Types and Purpose: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. (ELA-LITERACY.W.3.3.A, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.3.A, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.3.A, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.3.A, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.3.B, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.3.A, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.3.B)

 

The Building Blocks of Narrative: Workshop or Group Presentation

Stories are constructed just like buildings and bridges. Most students know that a narrative needs a beginning, middle, and an end, but other story elements can be more elusive. In either a large group or an in-class workshop (or both!), students will learn how to build a story starting with character.

  • Large Group Presentation (Grades K-8, 45min-1hr): Using examples from my own work, in the large group presentation I’ll explain the basics of building narrative. Students will participate by collaboratively building and acting out a story.
  • In-Class Workshop (Grades 3-8, 45min): Students will participate in a hands-on workshop to develop their own story ideas by identifying characters, wants, obstacles, and solutions. Students will come out of the workshop with a framework and ready to write a story.
  • Common Core Connection: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.3.A, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.3.A, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.3.A, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.3.A, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.3.B, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.3.A, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.3.B

 

Building Your Perfect World: A Workshop in Setting

Grades 3-8, 45 minutes plus time for questions

The Firefly Code and The Daybreak Bond are both set in a utopia in the near-future. In this workshop I’ll share how I set up the geography, the architecture, and the rules of this utopia. Students will have a chance to begin designing their own perfect worlds as well.

Common Core Connection: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.3.A, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.3.A, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.3.A, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.3.A, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.3.B, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.3.A, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.3.B

Curriculum Connection: Social Studies: Law, Government, and Constitutions; Neighborhood and Cities

 

Writing is Revising:

Grades 3-12, 60 minutes

A presentation on revision of a published novel, followed by a workshop that teaches key revision techniques for fiction.

  • For this workshop, students should have a piece of fiction they would like to revise.

Common Core Connections:

  • Production and Distribution of Writing: With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing. (ELA-LITERACY.W.3.5, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.5, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.5, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.5, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.5, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.5)

 

Research into Writing

Grades 4-8, 45 minutes, plus time for questions

I hate research! Is that what your students say? Well, if I’m being honest, I used to say that, too – and I’m a librarian! As a writer, research is essential. Whether you’re writing fiction or nonfiction, research is essential. In my research, I’ve learned more about a big topic, like the history of bottled water for The Water Castle, or sought out small details, like the price of a can of tuna in 1954 for The Spy Catchers of Maple Hill. In this presentation, I’ll share stories of my research, how I incorporate my research into my writing, and, most importantly, how I came to love research and embrace it as part of the writing process.

Common Core Connections:

  • Research to Build and Present Knowledge:
    • Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic (CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.7, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.7, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.7)
    • Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.8, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.8, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.8)

Rates:

  • Daily rate: $1000 plus travel expenses.
  • I am willing to travel, and encourage schools to team up with other schools to share expenses.

 

Virtual:

I also do Skype Visits!

  • As my schedule permits, I will do free twenty minute Q&A Skype sessions for book groups or classes who have read one of my books.
  • Please contact me directly to make arrangements: megan @ meganfrazer.com